Global Voices Digest


January 31, 2006, 1:36 am
Filed under: Digests

Indonesian Bloggers Get Proactive

Twenty representatives of various blogging communities met last week to discuss ways in which more Indonesians could be encouraged to blog as well as ways to raise the standard of online dialogue throughout the country. Enda Nasution reports that among the various proposals were: a definitive source of blogging information, an online blog magazine, an “Indonesian Blog Year,” and 5,000 free CD’s about blogging. Make sure not to miss the link to the new weblog of Miss Indonesia 2001 whose last post has already drawn 400 comments.

Chinese New Year in Malaysia

Soon Kheng Thew, reporting from Malaysia, continues this week’s series on celebrations of Chinese New Year throughout Asia. While most Chinese-Malaysians brought in the Year of the Dog with family dinners and fireworks, one dedicated blogger managed to post 22 entries … just short of his goal of 40.

Bahraini Royal Family Needs PR Makeover

Mahmood Al-Yousif scans the Bahraini blogosphere and finds some consensus that the royal family needs to hire a new public relations firm to repair injured relations between the monarchy and citizenry.

Tet: Lunar New Year in Vietnam

Tu Van Cong, writing from Hanoi, explains the typical celebrations surrounding Tet, the Vietnamese Lunar New Year. Fireworks have been banned, but shopping sprees, big dinners, and tasty treats seem plentiful among Vietnamese bloggers.

Afghani Bloggers React to London Conference

Beginning today, the London Conference on Afghanistan will set out to “establish a framework for cooperation between Afghanistan and the international community,” but Farid Pouya says Afghani bloggers have mixed feelings about the viability of such an endeavour including a distrust of non-governmental organizations’ use of funding. Pouya also links to two bloggers worried about recent media censorship despite the boom in private TV networks.

The state of Nepalese immigrants in Malaysia, political punditry in Barbados, lesbian envy, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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January 30, 2006, 2:18 am
Filed under: Digests

Introduction to Ukrainian Blogosphere

The English-language blogosphere in Ukraine has greatly diversified since the November and December 2004 Orange Revolution says Veronica Khokhlova. Her introduction to Ukraine’s blogging community offers an excellent doorstep not only into the political punditry heating up the campaign season, but also less political commentators such as a visiting Fulbright fellow researching online marriage agencies.

WSF Bamako – What it means for Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa Editor, Sokari Ekine explains the significance of holding part of this year’s World Social Forum in Bamako, Mali. Unfortunately, few bloggers covered the forum and even fewer attended, but from those who did, an unproductive spirit of anti-Americanism seemed to pervade the gathering of social activists.

Not Everyone’s Festival

Colombian journalist, Efraim Medina Reyes explains his new project, “No Hay Festival;” an online documentary of Cartagena’s “dark side” during the illustrious and costly literary gathering, “Hay Festival.”

Year of the Dog

We have entered the year of the dog according to the Chinese lunar calendar and Frank Dai has a thorough rundown of what Chinese bloggers have to say about it. Make sure not to miss the mouth-watering photos of the traditional Chinese banquet or the English translation of Luo Yonghao’s New Year’s wishes.

New Awareness in Caracas

Complementing Sokari Ekine’s post on the World Social Forum in Mali, Venezuelan contributor, Iria Puyosa, sums up the buzz coming from the sister event taking place in Caracas. The majority of conference attendees complained about the lack of organization while forum protesters spoke out against economic state intervention.

Global Melting Pot

Chef Melissa De Leòn Douglass keeps readers hungry again this week with another trip around the world’s food blogs. Her encyclopedic knowledge of world cuisine is on display with culinary posts this week from Guyana, China, India, the Galapagos Islands and more.

Turkey is Typing…

Deborah Ann Dilley dips briefly into the Turkish blogosphere and finds “We Are The Turks,” a new blog dedicated to spotlighting prominent Turks in American business and society.

Posts in Pakistan

Humorous as always, Omer Alvie reports from Pakistan that a new weblog, “DesiCritics.org” has been launched with over 90 contributing writers.

New Awareness in Caracas

East Asia Editor, Jose Manuel Tesoro reminds readers that what is usually referred to as “Chinese New Year” is, in fact, celebrated throughout Asia. Linking to bloggers from Korea, Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia, and Cambodia, he shows that the Year of the Fire Dog was brought in with international cheer.

A book collection campaign for Mosul University in Iraq, the potential end to free internet in Armenia, reactions to Hamas’ win in Palestine, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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January 25, 2006, 1:46 am
Filed under: Digests

No Silver Lining in Iraq

Our newest contributor, Salam Adil, doesn’t find much reason for optimism from Iraqi bloggers assessing their country after the elections. The current government is compared to Saddam’s, exiled Iraqi’s in Dubai are becoming more extremist, and utility services throughout the country remain undependable according to several Iraqi bloggers.

New in Nigeria

David Ajao takes a broad survey of Nigeria’s weblogs including two who focus this week on the lack of infrastructure in the oil-rich Niger Delta region. Both bloggers see the centralized consolidation arising from corrupt governance and corporate greed.

Bangalore or Bengaluru?

Searching through South Asia’s spiderweb of blogs, Kamla Bhatt points out a fierce online debate over whether the “Silicon Valley of Southern India,” currently Bangalore, should change its name to Bengaluru as is planned. At least one blogger says India’s addiction to updating place-names must stop.

The Race to Wire Brazil

MIT’s $100 laptop has some proprietary competition in Brazil according to polyglot Patrick Hall. Translating excerpts from several Brazilian blogs, Hall finds that Microsoft’s pay-per-use computer plan is, so far, more popular than open source alternatives despite the fact that a blogger has shown it is typically twice as expensive.

Bad news for Haitian democracy, prophetic letdown in Kenya, a Taiwanese government guide to picking up local girls for foreigners, the medicinal uses of leeches in Poland, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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January 24, 2006, 1:33 am
Filed under: Digests

Normalcy Returns to Bahrain

After a controversial and then tragic week, Mahmood Al-Yousif reports that the Bahraini blogosphere has returned to normalcy. Among other news, one blogger was elected to the steering committee of Bahrain’s largest political party.

Unequal Distribution of African Resources

African female bloggers in Kenya are keeping their eyes on the government’s poor distribution of food during the nation’s current famine. Nish Matenjwa also brings up blog-talk on Nigeria’s ban on gay marriage and support of gay rights.

Mugabe’s 82nd Birthday Bash

Zimbabwean bloggers are dismayed by extravagant plans for President Robert Mugabe’s upcoming birthday. Covering the Great Lakes region of Africa, Zim Pundit also features the weblog, Rwandan Survivors which publishes survivors’ testimonies of the 1992 genocide.

Election Eve in Palestine

The day before Palestinians’ first legislative elections since 1996, Shaden Abdul Rahman describes, in detail, the arising tensions between the Hamas and Fatah factions. A must read for anyone who wishes to understand the outcome of tomorrow’s election.

Karzai Taking Orders from U.S.?

Farid Pouya reports that some Afghan bloggers believe President Karzai’s trip to Iran was not cancelled because of the officially stated reason of “bad weather and technical problems,” but instead was an act of compliance to U.S. orders.

A new blog on Armenian hip-hop, fear of being kidnapped in Haiti, day one of the World Social Forum in Venezuela, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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January 23, 2006, 1:31 am
Filed under: Digests

Violent Protest Mars Religious Holiday in Ethiopia

Andrew Heavens gets the first-hand accounts of bloggers who were present at last week’s violent protests in Addis Ababa during the Ethiopian Orthodox Church’s festival of the Epiphany.

Global Food in the Kitchen

Panamanian chef and food contributor, Melissa De Leòn Douglass takes readers for a culinary tour around the world’s food blogs and finds some delicious recipes as well as a lesson in pig etymology.

Turkish Bird Fear

The festival of Kurban Bayrami has ended, but Deborah Ann Dilley writes that Turkish bloggers continue to avoid poultry as a fear of bird flu lingers.

“Lightless” in Cambodia

It seems that Cambodian bloggers have just enough electricity to speak out against the unreliable service. ThaRum Bun writes that one blogger has experienced so many power outages that he is now out of candles.

BBC filtered in Iran, elections in Gaza, the New York Times’ four newest Iraqi blog correspondents, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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January 20, 2006, 4:37 am
Filed under: Digests

Reaction to Chinese Investment in Nigerian Oil: Imnakoya covers Nigerian blogs in the past week including the mixed reactions towards China’s expressed desire to invest in the Nigerian oil industry.
Remembering the Zanzibar Revolution: Surveying the Kiswahili-language blogs of Tanzania, Ndesanjo Macha says bloggers are hoping for peace in politically volatile Zanzibar.
South Asian Neologisms: Kamla Bhatt takes readers around the South Asian blogosphere and finds, among other interesting topics, a blog solely dedicated to new words emerging in multilingual India.
Guatemalan Bloggers Remember to Give: Juliana Parra Rincón translates a post by Guatemalan blogger Mauricio Romero, which sums up the 2005 year of Guatemalan blogs, emphasizing a project by several young bloggers to collect Christmas gifts online and distribute them to rural children.

Bloggers say no to banning Iran from this year’s World Cup, race relations in the Bahamas, a Bangladeshi petition against Jamaat al-Islamiyya, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.



January 19, 2006, 4:36 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

Keeping Clothes on in Morocco: Farah Kinani looks at the reactions of Moroccan bloggers to a recent fatwa prohibiting nude sex by Egyptian scholar, Dr Rashad Khalil.
Smoke Free Kurdistan: Deborah Ann Dilley is back with a thorough summary of Kurdish blogs including one post about a completely cigarette-free Kurdish village.
Sad State of Bolivian Soccer: Bolivia wasn’t even close to qualifying for this year’s World Cup, but as Eduardo Avila reveals, the lack of wins isn’t keeping Bolivians from starting fan blogs.

A traditional wedding in Tajikstan, robotics in Jamaica, a podcast about the Baghdadi Jewish community of Calcutta, India, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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