Global Voices Digest


February 28, 2006, 12:43 am
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Feb. 28, 2006

The Week in Kenyan Blogs

Who knew? Kenya’s bloggers discuss high school rugby with near-religious reverence. One blogger says goodbye, another has returned with a vivid account of a trip to the Kenya-Uganda border, and Kenyan Pundit says that 100 scholarships will be made available for a TED global conference to be held in Arusha, Tanzania in June of 2007. All this and more in Juliana R’s comprehensive summary of Kenyan bloggers.

Pedophiles in Poland

Seventeen pedophiles were arrested in Poland as part of a larger, global internet child porn sting which began in Spain. Jordan Seidel commences his Global Voices involvement from Poland with a recap of an online debate over whether or not simply viewing the images should also be considered criminal. Also discussed: brain drain and disagreement over the country’s finest city.

Politics and Nostalgia in El Salvador

Local elections are just two weeks away in El Salvador and Tim Muth is on top of what both Spanish and English-language bloggers have to say about the close race between the country’s main two parties, ARENA and the FMLN. For the politically disinclined, don’t miss the newly updated photo-blogs at the end of Muth’s post.

Iraq in Crisis – The Optimists Strike Back

Salam Adil continues his consistent coverage of the sectarian crisis in Iraq caused by last week’s bombing of the Al Askari mosque. The apparent consensus is that cries of impending civil war were premature, inflammatory, and irresponsible.

Afghan Whispers

Farid Pouya weighs in with excerpts from two Afghan bloggers; the first who implores foreign forces to remain in Afghanistan to bolster the country’s security and the second who has a difficult time understanding laws in some European countries that criminalize the act of doubting the holocaust’s historicity.

The part-Christian, part-Pagan, and pre-Easter Russian holiday of Maslyanitsa, photo feature of renewed violence in Nepal, Jamaica’s first female Prime Minister, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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February 27, 2006, 1:42 am
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Feb. 27, 2006

Syria This Week

Yazan Badran takes a look at the Syrian blogosphere and finds a relatively calm week after a month of calls against violence incited by the Danish cartoons. This week, hear what Syrian bloggers have to say about America’s interest in their country as well as an optimistic look towards the future of Syria’s children.

Haiti’s Lone Blogger on Elections

Haiti’s lone blogger doesn’t even have his own home internet connection says Alice Backer. But thanks to Yon Ayisyen’s (a nom de plume) persistence and Backer’s translation, we get to see at least one Haitian’s thoughtful analysis of his country’s recent controversial election and his distaste for the declared victor, Rene Preval.

Tunisian Blogging Workshop

Tunisian bloggers have long wanted to evangelize the medium, especially to their fellow countrymen outside of the populous capital, Tunis. A first step to that goal was realized last week when four bloggers traveled 55 kilometers to Zaghouan and gave a presentation to fifty students, mostly girls, about blogging. Find out what themes were covered and how the students reaction in Mohamed Marwen Meddah’s excellent description.

Campaigning in Israel

Lisa Goldman is back with her detailed coverage of the Israeli blogosphere just as campaigning starts to heat up with six weeks left until general elections. Here’s your chance to gauge the online political punditry. And if you’ve had enough of politics, don’t miss the tragic story of a Parisian Jew who was tortured to death by kidnappers and an “Israeli anti-Semitic Cartoon Contest” with the tagline, “no Iranian will beat us on our home turf!”

Voices of African Women Bloggers

Sokari Ekine rounds up various blogs of African women with an important call to refrain from hateful, misogynistic, and homophobic language that has lately been seen around the region’s weblogs. Also featured: African soccer, fun questions answered by Kenyan bloggers, and reflections on James Frey and Lynden David Hall.

Odes to African-American science fiction writer, Octavia Butler, Western donors and Uganda’s new president, Mashramani in Guyana, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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February 26, 2006, 1:45 pm
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Global Voices Online – Feb. 26, 2006

Welcome to a special weekend edition of the Global Voices digest. You worked hard last week, probably a little too hard, and you deserve a vacation. Why not let our contributors take you for a tour of the world? I’ve included hyperlinks to the Google Maps satellite view of each region being discussed. Let’s start with Carnival in Trinidad and Tobago.

The web make to blog on Carnival day…

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Trinidadian contributor, Nicholas Laughlin doesn’t have to try hard to prove he’s having more fun than we are this weekend. After months of preparation, the country is completely consumed by Carnival. Those of you who follow the Caribbean blogosphere on Global Voices know that the region’s bloggers have been disillusioned by the growing consumerism of the festival, but this week social commentary yields to celebration and merrymaking. See Laughlin’s extraordinarily worthwhile post to learn more about J’Oouvert, “Monday Mas”, and why one reckless man cut hundreds of zinc rectangles in the name of art. You are sure to be telling yourself you’ll be in Trinidad and Tobago next February so don’t miss Attillah Springer’s Carnival survival guide which includes a small vial of snake oil and a soca CD.

The Week in Saudi Arabia

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Ahmed takes his weekly “Pulse of the Saudi Blogosphere” and finds the usual persistence of palpitating assessment. Just how contentious is the debate over whether women should be allowed to drive or not? How do Saudis behave in Bahrain? What did the Jeddah Economic Forum accomplish, if anything at all? Should one region’s folk dance be taught across the entire country? Ahmed offers insight to these questions and more in his lucid compilation of the Saudi blogosphere.

Update: Samarra Catastrophe

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If you remember Salam Adil’s first rundown of what Iraqi bloggers were saying about the bombing of Al Askari Mosque on Wednesday, you know the country was on edge and fearful of civil war breaking out. This weekend Adil is back with an eye-opening update. To quote just one blogger: “Fierce streetfighting at my doorstep for the last 3 hours. Rumor in the neighbourhood is that men in black are trying to enter the area. Some armed kids defending the local mosque three blocks away are splattering bullets at everything that moves, and someone in the street was shouting for people to prepare for defending themselves. … The news from other areas in Baghdad are horrible. I don’t think it’s being reported anywhere.”

Update: Samarra Catastrophe

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If you remember Salam Adil’s first rundown of what Iraqi bloggers were saying about the bombing of the Al Askari mosque on Wednesday, you know the country was on edge and fearful of civil war breaking out. This weekend Adil is back with an eye-opening update. To quote just one blogger: “Fierce streetfighting at my doorstep for the last 3 hours. Rumor in the neighbourhood is that men in black are trying to enter the area. Some armed kids defending the local mosque three blocks away are splattering bullets at everything that moves, and someone in the street was shouting for people to prepare for defending themselves. … The news from other areas in Baghdad are horrible. I don’t think it’s being reported anywhere.”

Weekend World Food Works

After your trip around the world with Global Voices’ contributors, it’ll be time for some food. Our in-house Panamanian chef extraordinaire is back from Ecuador to share some special treats including fortuitous sushi balls, alfajores from Argentina, and how to eat for free while in Rome.

From the Jordanian Blogosphere

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More than just Iraqis are outraged by the bombing of Al Askari. Roba Al Assi reports from Jordan on what her country’s bloggers have to say regarding the attack. A few are stupefied that Danish cartoons evoked so much ire among Arab bloggers while many keep silent when it comes to Muslim on Muslim violence. Al Assi’s recap also covers bloggers’ feelings over the national budget and an analysis of media coverage by Middle Eastern news outlets.

From the Jordanian Blogosphere

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We end this weekend’s journey in Turkey where Deborah Ann Dilley adds a new twist to her weekly update by noting the number of times each Turkish blogger has posted in the past three weeks. On this last leg, don’t miss the tragic assassination of a Catholic priest, a visit to the courthouse where several Turkish journalists are being held, and Turkey’s first Olympic figure skater, Tugba Karademir who began practicing on Ankara’s sole ice rink until her family sacrificed their comfortable life there and moved to Ontario, Canada to realize her potential.

Train connectivity in India, Turkmenistan’s spending priorities, a Peruvian presidential candidate’s thoughts on gay marriage, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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February 24, 2006, 12:21 am
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Global Voices Online – Feb. 24, 2006

Iraqi Voices on Samarra’s Catastrophe

Iraqi bloggers have plenty to say about Wednesday’s bombing of Al Askari Mosque, a revered Shi’ite shrine in Samarra; a Sunni majority town. Salam Adil’s captivating report quotes bloggers’ descriptions of their country’s tense atmosphere on the eve of what some (but certainly not all) are calling an impending civil war as well as guesses of who was behind the bombing and who is to benefit.

Argentina’s Legislator Blogs

Mariano Amartino explains a new project underway in Argentina which offers a free and secure weblog to national and local legislators. So far, 12 legislators have begun communicating directly with their constituents in the first 10 weeks of the project. A portal page aggregates the posts of all the politicians involved.

An engineer’s analysis of a deadly Moscow market collapse, blogging against street harassment in India, a new cartoon controversy in Malaysia, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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February 23, 2006, 1:51 am
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Feb. 23, 2006

From the Arabic-Speaking Blogosphere

Haitham Sabbah does globaphiles an enormous favor by translating choice excerpts from the Arabic blogosphere. While there is no central theme, it’s an exciting glimpse into the daily lives of individuals we rarely hear from speaking about such varied topics as Kuwait’s fresh shrimp black market and a blind teacher’s experiences with technology in Saudi Arabia.

Kurdistance

Vladimir van Wilgenburg of the weblog From Holland to Kurdistan was recently interviewed about his online involvement with Kurdish communities on the satellite TV network, “Roj TV.” Deborah Ann Diley notes the interest the interview has sparked and gives context to Roj TV’s own trials and tribulations in her weekly summary of Kurdish bloggers.

Philippines: Landslide and Rescue efforts

Contributor Angelo Embuldeniya keeps readers abreast of developments in the major landslide, which engulfed the central Philippines village of Guinsaugon last Friday.

New Politics in Bolivia

Bolivian bloggers continue to test the waters of their country’s new administration. In this week’s roundup of Bolivian commentary, Eduardo Ávila points to bloggers discussing themes and politicians that typically stay out of the spotlight such as the Ministry of Sports, the qualifications of the new Minister of Justice, and a weblog of the Federation of Press Workers’ Union.

Carnival of Blog Translation

A multitude of languages remains one of the gems of modern cultural diversity worldwide, but it’s also a pain in the ass when it comes to tracking global online conversation. Latin America regional editor David Sasaki writes about one blogger’s grassroots movement to unite polyglots next Tuesday for a “Carnival of Blog Translation” in which each participant translates a blog post from one language to another.

A distressed cheerleader in Singapore, the Vagina Monologues in Nigeria, a virtual tour of Moscow, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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February 22, 2006, 2:19 am
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Feb. 22, 2006

Interview with Chilean Senator Fernando Flores

Rosario Lizana sits down with Chilean senator and author, Fernando Flores to discuss styles of blogging as well as the difference between bullshitting and lying in the blogosphere.

Cayman Cop Bloggers Get Dooced?

Georgia Popplewell tracks a blog scandal unfolding in the Cayman Islands which involves “a blogging policeman, a local newspaper and a witch hunt by an irate constabulary.” Almost too good to be true, this is a must read for anyone who’s been brave or foolish enough to blog about his/her employer.

African women blogging this week

Marc dips into Kenya’s blogosphere this week and reports back with posts that range from the difficulties of moving to high-level resignations following an anti-corruption report to a remembrance of soul singer and cancer victim, Lynden David Hall.

Information Wants to be Free in Iran

Despite the continued – if not increased – censorship of books in Iran and a push for regulation of weblogs, Farid Pouya finds that Iranian bloggers think their government can no longer keep information from getting out.

Arranged marriage blues in India, funeral customs in Kyrgyzstan, Indonesia’s model/blogger turned Playboy bunny, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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February 16, 2006, 2:03 am
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Feb. 21, 2006

Afghanistan’s Civil Society

Farid Pouya’s latest report from the Afghani blogosphere finds a call for greater dialogue and acceptance as the global village continues to shrink.

Pakistan Sticks to Cartoons

Omer Alvie recaps Pakistan’s English-language bloggers in typically satirical form, finding that most are still writing about the protests sparked by the Danish cartoons.

African women blogging this week

Kenyan poet, Nish Matenjwa takes a look at Africa’s women bloggers and finds concerns about Uganda’s state of democracy, Nigerian “geles,” and much more.

Bahrain’s Busy Bloggers

Mahmood Al-Yousif’s comprehensive summary of Bahraini blogs has something for absolutely everyone. A Christian event promotes multicultural tolerance as does a declaration (in English and Arabic) by Arab intellectuals asking for more tolerance, dialogue, and understanding following the cartoon controversy. Also discussed: anti-semitism by a leading artist, Bahrain’s customer service, origins of Bahraini colloquialisms, and a planned March meeting between visiting Belgian bloggers and their Bahraini counterparts.

Voices from Zimbabwe and the Great Lakes

Zim Pundit sums up what has been an active week in the South-Central Great Lakes region of Africa including a Valentine’s Day protest march by Women of Zimbabwe Arise and an explanation of “the Nescafe Model of Development” in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

China’s Steamed Bun Lawsuit

The debate over internet censorship in China continues after last week’s U.S. congressional hearing, but Tian Yi says that most Chinese bloggers are keeping quiet about the issue. Rather, he notes, the Chinese-language blogosphere is transfixed on a lawsuit brought forth by a prominent film director against a spoof artist. Yi offers his own analysis of why the lawsuit has trumped censorship.

Hugo Chavez’s proposed indefinite rule of Venezuela, test your knowledge on Albania, South Africa’s upcoming local elections, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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