Global Voices Digest


March 30, 2006, 11:29 pm
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Mar. 31, 2006

Landing at the Iraqi Blogodrome

Salam Adil’s latest report on the Iraqi blogosphere emphasizes the obvious: daily life in Iraq is far from becoming more secure. It especially hits home when reading the doleful reflections of a blogger whose older brother was kidnapped, tortured, and murdered. This, less than a year after his younger brother was also killed by kidnappers. In a sliver of silver lining, find out which Iraqi blogger was long listed for BBC Four’s prestigious Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction.

Pulse of the Saudi Blogosphere

Empathy seems to be an overarching theme in Ahmed Al-Omran’s synopsis of Saudi bloggers. Hear what they have to say about the release of detained author Mohsen Al-Awaji, Al Jazeera’s loss of viewers, knee-jerk anti-Americanism, and the moral of Steven Spielberg’s movie, Munich. Also, a new Arabic social bookmarking tool.

Nigerian blogs this Week

Power outages remain a source of constant aggravation in Nigeria and at least one blogger wants to know why solar energy isn’t yet an affordable alternative to the costly generators that more and more homes and businesses rely on. Also, don’t miss a post on multiculturalism in Nigerian society and another on intolerance in Africa’s burgeoning blogosphere.

A showdown at a Bolivian airport, the English translation of a a Belarusian protestor’s jail journal, post-election political talk at an Israeli dentist’s office, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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March 30, 2006, 4:21 pm
Filed under: Digests

Today’s Global Voices newsletter had one factual error and did not include Deborah Ann Dilley’s excellent summary of Kurdish bloggers.

Argentina’s military coup of 1976 did not depose Eva Perón, but rather, Isabel Martínez de Perón. Thanks to Iria Puyosa for pointing this out.

Kurdistance: Echoes of Violence, Identity and the New Year

Halabja is a predominantly Kurdish town about 150 miles northeast of Baghdad. It was the site of a poisonous gas massacre, which killed thousands of Kurds in March of 1988 and has since, paradoxically, unified them in remembrance. Eighteen years later local Kurds burned down a memorial of the massacre in protest of the Kurdistan Regional Government’s corruption and reconstruction priorities. Deborah Ann Dilley sums up Kurdish bloggers’ reactions to the burning of the monument nicely.

I apologize for the mistakes.

David Sasaki

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March 30, 2006, 12:21 am
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Mar. 30, 2006

March 24 in the Argentinean Blogosphere

Last Friday marked the 30th anniversary of the coup which removed Eva Peron and installed Argentina’s long-lasting military dictatorship. Jorge Gobbi says that most Argentineans view the anniversary as a way to not let the past repeat itself, but just what lessons should be taken away is up for debate according to Gobbi’s summary of Argentine bloggers.

DRC: A Chat with Blogger Tony Katombe

When Francophone Editor Alice Backer sat down to interview Anthony Mica Katombe of the Democratic Republic of the Congo via instant messenger, she hardly could have expected that gunmen were surrounding his hometown of Kinshasa, Kofi Annan was visiting in person to check in on a rocky electoral process, and that a brief electrical outage would interrupt their chat. Regardless, they both withstood the obstacles and have an intriguing conversation to show for it. When asked why the DRC has a more active blogging community than neighboring countries, Katombe responds, “he who aches the most screams the loudest.”

Charles Taylor: As the Story Unfolds

When the Nigerian government promised to hand over Charles Taylor to be prosecuted at a UN Court in Sierra Leone for war crimes, the former Liberian president was declared missing from his asylum villa. He was then caught attempting to flee the country and has since landed in Sierra Leone where he will await trial. Chippla Vandu digests the vast quantity of commentary and analysis regarding Taylor’s attempted escape, Nigeria’s culpability, and what his trial could mean for the unstable region.

Dangdut music and dance in Singapore and all about Home

Who doesn’t love a cheesy love song from time to time? Especially an Indonesian love song at a Singaporean club. Preetam Rai’s latest post will not only teach you how to distinguish Dangdut from other musical genres of Southeast Asia, you’ll also be able to dance to it. And if you’re too shy for the dance floor, find out what one group of bloggers discovered on a cemetery tour.

Moroccan Arabic Blogs

Farah Kinani reports that language politics continue in Morocco’s blogosphere where several bloggers defend why they write in their chosen language. This week, however, Kinani decides to focus on blogs in Arabic, giving readers an introduction to their general topics

The Week That Was – Bolivian Blogs

“Terrorist bombings just don’t happen in Bolivia,” begins Eduardo Ávila in his weekly Wednesday dispatch. Which is why last week’s explosions at two budget hotels in La Paz filled the Bolivian blogosphere with speculation of the culprits’ motives and connections. Several bloggers disapproved of Evo Morales’ conjecture that the United States could have been responsible.

Law students on the first anniversary of Kyrgyzstan’s Tulip Revolution, a brutal and horrific murder in Trinidad and Tobago, Vladimir Putin’s potentially plagiarized Ph.D. dissertation, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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March 28, 2006, 10:51 pm
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Mar. 29, 2006

Kenyan Sphere Dispatch

One of the hottest new words in the Swahili vocabulary of most Kenyans is “Mamluki,” an ancient term for mercenaries. Juliana R explains why in her latest recapitulation of Kenya’s blogging community.

This week in Israel: Elections

Israelis went to the polls yesterday to elect a new government. Or, that is, some did says Lisa Goldman referring to the all-time low voter turnout. To better understand why the centrist Kadima party won and what it means for Israel’s future, check out Goldman’s review of what Israeli bloggers were saying as the elections got underway.

Bangladesh Blog Buzz

Rezwan’s ten point summary of Bangladesh’s blogosphere features the account of one young Bangladeshi woman in London whose parents are arranging her marriage. Also, make sure not to miss Shakia Khan’s short homemade documentary appropriately titled “Seasons Beginning.”

Tourism, Islamic Vietnam & Blogs

Iran’s government would like to attract more tourism to the country, but bloggers list several obstacles. Also, can weblogs instigate revolution or are they merely a tool of the elite?

From Charango to Sea Controversy

The charango musical instrument isn’t the only catalyst of conflict between Chile and Bolivia writes Rosario Lizana from Santiago. A dispute over sea access was what sparked the War of the Pacific between the two nations in 1879 and it continues in the form of digital debate on 21st century weblogs. Lizana has a roundup of what Chilean bloggers think about the issue.

Sustained stereotypes in Malaysia, Jamaica’s quite serious school rivalry, hopes for a non-violent ‘April Revolution’ in Nepal, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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March 28, 2006, 3:32 pm
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Mar. 28, 2006

Polish Blogosphere Update

The blogger’s infamous critical eye turns inward in Poland this week where Jordan & Maria Seidel have summarized the latest offerings of the Polish blogosphere. Because let’s face it, your local paper hasn’t told you about the Yeti-like creature running around Southeastern Poland.

Arabisc: Moderate Muslim Voices

Haitham Sabbah takes readers into the Arabic-language blogosphere with translated excerpts from three Arab bloggers. Find out what an Egyptian student says about standing up for free speech, why a Kuwaiti is upset by his country’s religious intolerance, and what the latest trend is in Saudi novels.

The Charango Controversy

It seems that the charango, an Andean lute-like instrument, has become the vogue diplomatic gift in South America. But where did it originate and why is it causing unwanted conflict between Bolivia and Chile? Eduardo Ávila translates a post by Miguel Esquirol with the answers.

African Music Roundup #5

Obi Orjiekwe’s latest rundown of African music blogs includes tributes to Malian blues guitarist, Ali Farka Touré, who passed away last week at the age of 67. Speaking of Mali, find out why festival goers from all over Africa will be headed to Northern Mali in early September.

An interview with the the Armenia Country Director of the Norwegian Refugee Council, the rocky development of China’s anti-sexual harassment laws, what a woman wants in Yemen, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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March 27, 2006, 12:32 am
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Mar. 27, 2006

African women blogging this week

Sokari Ekine’s weekly roundup of female African bloggers features one blogger’s impassioned plea for more self-respect by her fellow women after reading comments related to the ongoing rape trial of South Africa’s former Deputy President, Jacob Zuma. Find out why the comments sparked her anger.

The Magic of Food: A Global Edible Review

Only our in-house chef, Melissa De Leòn Douglass is able to make pickled pig’s feet sound delectable, braised daikon seem very doable, and Central American sushi completely worthwhile. And then, there’s the roasted alligator. It’s time to pick your global recipe of the week.

The Lebanese Bloggers This Week: Less Politics, More Diversity

The recent rise in political commentary by Lebanese bloggers has receded says Mustapha, but “if you want to know more about the Lebanese Jews and Homosexuals in the Middle East, conspiracy theory taxi drivers, transliterating Arabic into English for SMS, and why the Lebanese in Brazil might be driving down the reading rate, read on.”

Quo vadis, Philippines?

Connie Veneracion writes her inaugural contribution from the Philippines, where political unrest and plenty of punditry run unabated. Accept her excellent navigation around the current power grab and the longstanding social problems that are once again stirring up dissent.

Thailand: The Question of Democracy

When Thai prime minister, Thaksin Shinawatra sold the telecommunications company he founded to the Singaporean government using a tax loophole, middle class Thais in Bangkok took to the streets in protest. With the House now dissolved and the opposition threatening to boycott elections, the state of Thailand’s democracy is not looking rosy says Enda Nasution in his summary of what local bloggers have to say regarding the good and bad of Shinawatra, the possibility of a temporary return to monarchy, and the general state of affairs in Thailand.

Secularism in Tajikstan, you know you’re Hatian when …, a potentially damaging picture of Congolese presidential candidate, Joseph Kabila, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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March 25, 2006, 11:49 pm
Filed under: Digests

Global Voices Online – Mar. 25 – 26, 2006

How to Tag Your Blog and Increase Your Readership

The exponential mushrooming of content on the World Wide Web is both more global and more difficult to manage. Erik Hersman has a helpful word of advice for all bloggers who would like to insert Technorati tags into their blog posts, which he says will not only classify content, but also increase readership. One such tag is “freehaowu“, which aggregates blog posts, pictures, and links related to the imprisoned Global Voices editor.

Pakistan: Blog-o-warming

Not even fried chicken gluttony can keep Omer Alvie from his weekly review of Pakistani blogs. In typically humorous fashion, he highlights posts on the festival of Noruz, thoughts on democracy, and more.

The Week That Was in Bahrain

Bahraini bloggers go global this week as they pen their thoughts on human rights abuses abroad, a petition by Iraqi expats, a workers’ movement in Dubai, and Gaddafi’s latest rhetoric from Libya. Closer to home, find out why Cat Stevens (now Yousif Islam) and scores of scholars traveled to Bahrain.

11 Quakes Hit Southern Iran

A 5.8 magnitude earthquake shook awake Southern Iran on Saturday morning. Disaster, relief, and rescue contributor, Angelo Embuldeniya has the very latest with links to valuable resources. So far, there are no reports of casualties.

Karachi’s World Social Forum, child abuse in Bermuda, an Ugandan journalist’s new blog, and much more can be found in today’s Global Roundups.

Get the blog buzz from East Asia, South Asia, the Americas, Middle East & North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia & the Caucasus.

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